Amal Clooney spotted in LA 26.02.2018

Amal Clooney was spotted in between appointments in Los Angeles on Monday afternoon.


Amal Clooney wore


buckle sleeve T-shirt


Available here


Velvet pants

GIVENCHY Horizon medium tote

Sold out

BURBERRY stretch boots

Sold out

ZANZAN ortolan sunglasses


Amal Clooney and Isla Fisher spotted hiking in LA 02.02.2018

Amal Clooney enjoys a hike with pal Isla Fisher as the two catch up in LA on Friday.

Amal Style Files

Amal Clooney wore black t-shirt and leggins with



Available here



Racquette sneakers in leather

And this version are still available here

With LINDA FARROW aviator sunglasses 307

Here an alternative for the military jacket

Camo jacket 82$ available here

Pictures via Dailymail/Coleman-Rayner

Amal and George Clooney at Lax airport 05.12.2017

Amal and George Clooney arrived at Lax airport and greeted Cindy Crawford and her husband Randy Gerber. Perhaps they made their holiday together. Cindy Crawford posted some photos of her holiday on her Instagram account. From the comments it could be a Fiji island.


Amal Clooney wore a black top with grey jeans and her

ZANZAN ortolan sunglasses

Amal Clooney spotted in Beverly Hills, 06.10.2017

Amal Clooney was spotted at Skin Care Salon in Beverly Hills in the past days. In a casual look she wore a black tee with ripped jeans and metallic wedge loafers.


Style Files

Amal Clooney wore a black tee with her

ZANZAN Ortolan sunglasses

Similar style available here



Metallic PACO RABANNE wedge Creeper

More information here





were available here

and a BALENCIAGA “Day” bag in tan

pre-owned available here



Amal Clooney and Nadia Murad at the United Nations Security Council Chamber 21.09.2017

Amal Clooney with Nadia Murad attended the UN Security Council meeting on Thursday as the council voted to investigate ISIS war crimes following her campaign that sought justice for Yazidis and other minorities.

Because of the vote, UN investigators can now help Iraq collect evidence to build potential war crimes cases against ISIS.
The council unanimously passed a resolution that asks the UN to establish an investigative team to help Iraq preserve evidence ‘that may amount to war crimes, crimes against humanity and genocide’ committed by the Islamic State group / Daesh.




Style Files

Amal Clooney wore


Pre-Fall 2017 suit and blouse


Alba Suede Block-Heel Pump

available here



Large Bancroft Leather Top Handle Satchel

in the color “Desert”

available here



Ortolan Tortoiseshell Gold Metal Arm sunglasses






via Instagram

Amal Clooney…

A post shared by Abdullah AlSharrah | AKA بوخلف (@alsharra7) on

Amal and George Clooney spotted walking in Berkshire 31.03.2017

Amal and George Clooney were spotted on a walk near their Sonning home in Berkshire with dog Louie and some friends.

The man walking with them is John Lambros, George’s close friend and actor.


Style Files

Amal Clooney wore

Verdugo Skinny Maternity Jeans

in Nottingham

available here  Bloomingdale’s



EUR 138,00 now EUR 92,00

available here on Yoox

with RAY BAN

Aviator classic sunglasses

in black with gold frame

available here on Ebay

with a green rain jacket  and a knitted hat (both previously worn).

Here some alternatives for Amal’s rain jacket :

Army Green Drop Shoulder Drawstring Hem Coat

$16 available here on Romwe

and a more expensive version

Short Parka

available here on Parka London



Amal Clooney calls for action against ISIS at the UN 09.03.2017



Human rights lawyer Amal Clooney urged Iraq and the world’s nations not to let Isis to “get away with genocide” in a speech in New York.

Joined by her client Nadia Murad, a Yazidi woman captured by the extremists in Iraq in 2014, she told Iraq Prime Minister Haider al-Abadi to send a letter to the Un Security Council in order to set up a vote on investigating war crimes.

Here is her speech in full:

Excellencies, Ladies and Gentlemen,

I thank the sponsors of this event for inviting me to address you once again at the United Nations. Six months ago, I came here to discuss the need for accountability for crimes committed by ISIS. I spoke to you as the lawyer for a group of victims of ISIS’ crimes, including Nadia Murad, who as a 21-year old girl was enslaved and raped by ISIS militants in Iraq. My message to you was that ISIS is a global threat, which requires a global response. And that the response should not be limited to the battlefield: the UN should also investigate ISIS’ crimes and make sure that those responsible are brought to justice.

Since my last address I have supported the United Kingdom’s initiative to have the Security Council set up an investigation into ISIS’ crimes in Iraq. This would allow the UN to work alongside Iraqis to collect evidence of crimes on the ground and identify specific individuals who are responsible for them. Over the last few months, I have met with Iraqi, EU and UN officials and members of the Security Council, including the Russian and US Ambassadors, to discuss this initiative. All of them expressed support for the idea of a UN investigation to be established by the Security Council with Iraq’s cooperation. So the UK took an admirable leadership role, and drafted a short resolution to make this a reality. This draft was presented to Iraq many months ago and Iraq has since repeatedly and publicly expressed its support for the initiative. As recently as October Foreign Minister Jaafari confirmed Iraq’s commitment to “a Campaign… led by the UN… [that would] include action to gather and preserve evidence of [ISIS’] crimes”. The Iraqi government is aware that a one-page letter to the Security Council requesting the investigation would be sufficient to trigger a vote on the resolution.

But months have passed, deadlines set by the UK have come and gone, and the Iraqi government has declined to send the letter. So there has been no vote, no resolution, no investigation. The Council could of course act without this letter. It could establish the investigation without Iraq’s consent, acting under Chapter VII of the UN Charter. It could refer the case to the International Criminal Court. The General Assembly could establish an accountability mechanism, as it did for Syria in December. Or the Secretary-General could launch an investigation. But none of this has happened yet. Instead, mass graves in Iraq still lie unprotected and un-exhumed.

Witnesses are fleeing. And there is still not one ISIS militant who has faced trial for international crimes anywhere in the world. So I am speaking to you, the Iraqi government, and to you, UN member states, when I ask: Why? Why has nothing been done? Could it be that these crimes are not serious enough to warrant an international investigation? NO – ISIS is today the most brutal terror group in the world, representing what the Security Council has called an “unprecedented threat” to international peace and security.

ISIS has carried out or inspired attacks in more than 31 countries that have killed over 2,000 people outside Syria and Iraq in the last 3 years alone. Inside Iraq, ISIS has attacked victims from every community including Shia Muslims, Sunni Muslims and Christians. And ISIS has made clear that it intends to destroy Yazidis, like Nadia, completely: through killings, forced conversions, and rape. The UN has concluded that ISIS is committing genocide against this group, and there can be no more serious crime. The UN was created as the world’s way of saying ‘never again’ to the genocide perpetrated by the Nazis. And yet here we are, 70 years later, discussing the UN’s inaction in the face of a genocide that we all know about, and that is ongoing. So is it that the political interests of powerful states stand in the way of accountability? Is that why, over two years after the genocide began, not one ISIS member has been brought to trial for it? No – this is not it either. As a human rights lawyer I am often told that my cause, while commendable, cannot succeed because of political realities. We have seen the Security Council paralysed over Syria, or the road to the International Criminal Court obstructed when powerful states block Council action. But here, ladies and gentlemen, we are dealing with ISIS. No one claims to respect or protect them. No veto-wielding member of the Council is on their side. And yet we are no closer to justice than when I addressed you last year.

Could it be, then, that crimes of this nature will be too difficult to prove? No — this is not a reason for inaction either. ISIS is a bureaucracy of evil leaving a trail of evidence behind it that no one is picking up. It has kicked bodies into uncovered mass graves. It set up a ‘Committee for the Buying and Selling of Slaves’ and courts to ‘legalise’ the purchase of women as property. It has kept detailed forms about its recru

its, including their name, phone number, address and previous terror experience. ISIS militants have even sent messages to Nadia from their phones, taunting her that they still have her family members in captivity… They don’t bother to hide their phone number when they do so: they know no one is looking for it.

Excellencies, ladies and gentlemen: what is shocking here is not just the brutality of ISIS but how long those who know about it can remain passive. If we do not change course, history will judge us, and there will be no excuse for our failure to act. We cannot say that ISIS’ crimes were not serious enough; we cannot say that the interests of powerful states stood in the way; or that these crimes are too hard to prove. That’s why I am asking you today: to stand up for justice. Every conflict reminds us that there can be no lasting peace without justice. A lack of accountability simply leads to continuing cycles of vengeful violence. So killing ISIS on the battlefield is not enough: we must also kill the idea behind ISIS by exposing its brutality and bringing individual criminals to justice. Justice is also what the victims want – ask the families of the American hostages Jim Foley and Steven Sotloff who were beheaded by the ISIS militant known as Jihadi John. When Jihadi John was reportedly killed by a drone strike in Syria, the hostages’ families said they would have preferred it if he had been arrested instead. Steven’s family said they wanted to “sit in a courtroom, watch him sentenced and see him sent to … prison”. Yazidi women like Nadia say the same: they want the chance to face their abusers in court; they want legal judgments to be published, to prevent their genocide later being denied. And they deserve nothing less. But justice will forever be out of reach if we allow the evidence to disappear: if mass graves are not protected, if medical evidence is lost, if witnesses can no longer be traced.

Excellencies, it is not too late to turn things around. I believe there is a common will among those in this room, among leaders in Baghdad and capitals around the world that ISIS should be held accountable in a court of law for its crimes. What is needed now is moral leadership to make it happen. Last week’s US State Department report on Iraq reminds us that the vast majority of serious human rights abuses being committed today in Iraq are committed by ISIS, and that all Iraqis – Sunni, Shia, Christian, Yazidi, and others – are its victims. So today, I wish to speak directly to Prime Minister Abadi: on behalf of all of ISIS’ victims, I call on you to send the letter to the Security Council requesting an investigation into ISIS crimes. Getting the UN involved was initially Iraq’s idea, and finally taking action to make it a reality would silence those who doubt your commitment to bring Daesh to justice.

And finally, to all UN member states: if this road to accountability through the Security Council is blocked, you must take the initiative to secure accountability in other ways available to you under the UN Charter. Don’t let this be another Rwanda, where you regret doing too little, too late. Don’t let ISIS get away with genocide.

Via the Independent



Style’s Files

Amal Clooney wore

Dress and coat from


Cruise/Resort collection 2017-2018

with SALVATORE  FERRAGAMO sunglasses

SF762S Sunglasses 001 Black

available here



Lorenzo pumps

available at Browns


United Nations – Human Rights

// GETTY / PurePeople