Amal Clooney at the Texas Conference For Women 2016 in Austin 15.11.2016

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“As women, there is a bond we all share,” Amal Clooney told a sold-out audience at the 17th Annual Texas Conference for Women at the Austin Convention Center. “

Amal Clooney has worked closely with many influential people, not the least of which being her philanthropist/award-winning actor husband George Clooney. But when asked whom she admires most as a role model, the human rights attorney answered from the heart.

“I think growing up my mother was definitely a role model, she was always a working woman and someone who is independent and cared about her career and cared about being independent but also had balance,” she said during a Q&A at the Texas Conference for Women, where she was the keynote speaker on Tuesday.

“She never lost her femininity and she believed the balance was important and that is something that stuck with me,” added Clooney, who looked elegant in a pinstripe dress.

Amal Clooney also mentioned associate Supreme Court Justice Sonia Sotomayor as one of her biggest inspirations. “When I was a junior lawyer she was incredible to watch in action in court, how she had so many cases in her head and firing questions at these lawyers standing before her,” she explained, adding, “But then also on the personal side, [she] was just lovely and I was the most junior and irrelevant person in her chamber … and she was very charming and very balanced.”

During her keynote speech, Amal Clooney discussed women’s rights around the world, and spoke at length about her 23-year-old Yazidi client Nadia Murad, who is now a political refugee in Germany after living in captivity as an ISIS sex slave. Since her escape, Murad has stood up to her former captors by becoming a women’s rights activist and by speaking out against the Islamic State. She has been nominated for the Nobel peace prize for her efforts.

“I am advocating for the United Nations Security Council to do more to prosecute [ISIS]. I am addressing the security council next month,” Amal Clooney promised.

In closing, she reminded the audience, “As women, there is a bond that we all share. It’s a bond of shared experience. Experiences that only women go through and struggles that only women face. The worst thing that we can do as women is not stand up for each other. And this is something that we can practice everyday no matter where we are or what we do. Because if we are united, there is no limit to what we can do.” via People magazine

 

Style Files

Amal Clooney wore a pinstriped dress with half sleeves

by GIORGIO ARMANI

I found the same dress in blue

available here at Neiman Marcus

(Amal’s dress has the same exposed zip too)

nmb391z_mz nmb391z_az

with PAUL ANDREW 

Zenaida pumps

14004-PaulAndrew-FW2014-15399930

If you want similar earrings, I found these ones and they are quite affordable.

available here £33.60

ap7010-750x750

64dfe59a4f8be8bee687a026a395c13a

 

Amal Clooney talking about how women's rights are essential human rights. #amalclooney @amalclooney #txconfwomen #TXConfWomen2016

A video posted by Texas Conference for Women (@txconfwomen) on

 

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GETTY Images

32 thoughts on “Amal Clooney at the Texas Conference For Women 2016 in Austin 15.11.2016

  1. I wonder what her definition of “femininity” is or what she would consider unfeminine…
    This kind of rhetoric has always bothered me, the “as women” thing, it just seems old-fashioned and restrictive towards one gender although I can see why it can make sense. We certainly go many things like childbirth, menstruation, and sex discrimination (the last not being unique to us), but it doesn’t mean we all have the same opinions on common shared experiences or that we even feel that we share a bond. I think this kind of talk assumes that because we have some shared experiences we will understand each other and have the same opinions. But even as a woman I think we should support each other in difficult situations because that’s the right thing to do, not necessarily because we are women.
    I hope that makes sense as I just wrote this out now, but something is nagging me about her speech.

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    • When I think about things that women have in common, I don’t immediately think about physical aspects. I think about e.g. the fact that in 2016 women still have a tougher time in the workplace than men and that stereotypes concerning women still exist. I think that women should be more supportive of other women who have achieved something. I think it’s a lot easier for women to find Amal Clooney an incredibly inspirational figure than the women they are a lot closer to. That’s where the support and admiration doesn’t come easily. I think that this should change. I think that women are hard on each other and judge each other very easily. So I think that the “as women” thing means that we should be more supportive of each other. That’s how I interpreted it.
      I’m not saying that the same situation doesn’t apply to men, but the difference there is that men still get ahead easier and hold more powerful positions.

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    • H:
      I also have questions about Amal’s speech. The problem is that only snippets are available. I even went to the website for the conference and couldn’t find a video or text for the speeches. But, from the quotes posted here, I am wondering if she equates “femininity” with “feminism”; they are clearly not the same thing. To me, the ultimate goal of feminism is to be treated equally based on one’s status as a human, one’s abilities etc. Therefore, feminism is something both genders can/should embrace. Being/maintaining one’s femininity( attractiveness?) has nothing to do with femininism.

      I do find it ironic that Amal disgarded her given name of Alamuddin and took the name of Clooney in light of her comments.

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      • Right, it would be great if we had the whole speech because I had this strange feeling about just the snippets given.

        I also think feminism is about the freedom of choice so it is up to Amal to choose whether or not to keep her surname. I don’t think she is “less” feminist for doing so and it is also a personal decision.

        Liked by 1 person

      • What does changing your name/taking your husband’s name have to do with the comments she made in her speech on women’s rights/human rights? You are conflating femininity (a socially constructed set of attributes, behaviors, and roles associated with being a woman) with a decision she made about changing her name. Femininity and changing one’s name do not, in my opinion, share charaacteristics in common.

        Liked by 1 person

      • H:
        Feminism is indeed about freedom of choice, but choice is based on recognition of a (separate) identity and of one’s equal status. This is where the issue of taking a spouse’s name comes into play. It is based on the historical definition of women as chattel, who had no ownership rights. More recently, there is the issue of professional identity. Many women- thru their own efforts- have established a separate identity in their professional and the question is why would they give this up? Others here have brought up the former democratic presidential candidate…the fact is that her surname became an issue in the past. I have also noticed that many feminist issues like the taking of a husband’s name, don’t appear to be on the radar of younger women. With the continued discrepancies in womens’ earning power, representation in Congress etc, CEO positions in major corporations to name a few areas, I would suggest that there is much to be done with regards to feminism and that the issue of discarding one’s surname is something that remains an issue to be looked at closely.

        Nati:
        Very many others on this blog have posted their concerns and objections to Jackson’s continual outrageous, negative comments. He/she fits the classic definition of a troll. I inquired about your posting commenting guidelines myself and there has unfortunately been no response from you. I did so because I find Jackson’s comments towards myself offensive and likewise his attacks on other posters. I have been puzzled about your lack of action on Jackson, because one of the roles of a moderator is to stop trolls like him/her from disrupting Internet discussions. Had someone like Jackson made the same statements at one of my village community meetings, he/she would have been promptly escorted out of the meeting. But, since he/she continues to be allowed here,the reasonable conclusion, I have reached is that Jackson is either known to you personally and/or affiliated with this blog. For this reason, I am discontinuing my participation here. I know I am not the only one who has reached this conclusion as many others who were terrific contributors no longer visit this site. I understand that you as owner of blog have the right to make decisions on who posts here, but others like myself also have the right to post in an environment where we are not continually offended. Regards, Amelie

        Like

    • I understand what you are trying to say and I would concer. In Amal’s ‘cases’…yes, we need to support these dear women that are suffering so much evil. But for example, just b/c Hillary is a ‘woman’, is not a good enough reason why she should be supported. It shouldn’t be about gender but about the important issues.
      P.S. I am Canadian🙃

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      • Debbie, I understand what you are saying.🙂 To add to your point, in America, and in this election in particular Being A Woman was reason to “celebrate” because it was historical. Hillary Clinton made history by being the first female to be a presidential nominee. She has made history. Believe me when I say, win or lose, Hillary was passionate about the issues. This was nothing new, her entire life has been spent caring about issues. And at a time, 40 years ago, when it wasn’t popular for women to concern themselves with such issues. She has groomed her life with a life of service. Win or lose, there is no denying her passion for the issues, hard work–hands on work, and dedication to a life of purpose. We have not seen the last of her—passion will compel her to continue to make a difference in the world. It’s all she knows. With women, with children, with American families….she will continue to make a difference. What she does next—remains to be seen.🙂

        Like

    • i hope you don’t get offended by my question…but.. are you a woman?
      and a straight one? I wouldn’t be able to address your point of view without this detail .

      Like

    • H, — I think I understand what you are saying. In addition, we have heard this time and time again; Taylor Swift said it & many others. It’s nothing new, especially in our country, USA, we hear it all the time. (I’m not putting down what Amal said), but I don’t think of myself as being a part of “a movement” by supporting other women. I just think of it as supporting another human being; whether it’s men, boys, women, girls, adults, children….I just support. I like to support my fellow human being.🙂 While at the same time, I understand what context Amal is coming from; a women’s rights perspective.🙂 And I get what you are saying, too, in your post.

      Like

    • I think many here are confusing “FEMININITY” with “FEMINISM”. Read the definition to see the difference. IT IS NOT THE SAME AT ALL! Femininity is beyond wearing make up and high heels. Hillary Clinton wears makeup but, in my mind, she is NOT feminine… Amal Clooney IS feminine. To be feminine is to embrace wholeheartedly to be a woman on its full set of meaning… a woman who has the traits and mannerism of a female… that delicacy on her gestures, that tender nature… that womanly thing that is characteristic to feminine women…. even though many straight woman are NOT feminine. For example, most gay women are not feminine because they embrace a male conduct, but you dont have to be gay to not be be feminine. And you dont have to be feminine to be a woman, of course. But to be a feminine woman is to be gracious, delicate in gestures, is to act in a way that emanates that softens delicacy that stands out from men.

      My point is that to be feminine and feminist are not even related on the sense of the meaning.

      To be feminist, every woman can be if they think and choose that. But to be feminine is not really a choice.. it is there or it is not there.. one cannot fake it. It is quite a complex thing that you just dont fake ! Some gay men try hard to fake it but to no avail because it is beyond just wearing makeup/ heels and rotating your wrist and try to talk with a high pitch…. it is so much more!

      Like

  2. Hitting it out of the ballpark. Again! Lovely dress and beautiful color. Nice long short-sleeve for autumn. Pretty line texture design on dress. Soft wave hair drips with sophistication. Each time she talks, her comfort & confidence keeps going up, uP, UP! It shows in her ease and relaxed stature. Amal for First Lady, 2020.🙂

    Like

  3. She echoes Hillary Clinton who first said that women’s rights are human rights in her speech in 1995 in a special session of the United Nations Fourth Annual Congress on Women in Beijing. The speech established her own political career. It is great that women like Amal are carrying the important torch forward.

    In addition to her speech, I think Amal looks stunning.

    Like

    • Jackson—isn’t it great that Hillary Clinton will forever be quoted? Brilliant woman! You posted a great comment in reference to Hillary. Her concession speech and her speech at the family defense gathering was filled with 50-some thought-provoking and inspirational one-liners and quotes. Check out her Twitter acct. for these great quotes, which are listed. Win or lose, this People’s President in the long run—-WINS.🙂 #ImStillWithHer #StrongerTogether

      Like

  4. 10:46 pm November 18, 2016 to CNN :
    Amal Clooney: “Donald Trump’s ideas would break international human rights laws.”
    Eleven people responded to her comment and all 11 comments

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  5. Ok….not sure why the post was malfunctioning…but the last sentence from my last post was how — 11 people negatively responded to Amal’s comment about Trump.
    Let’s vote for First Lady Amal Clooney 2020!🙂

    Like

    • Amal First Lady in 2020? LOL. Good joke. I doubt she is the type Trump is going for, and i doubt even more that Melania would make room for her voluntarily.

      Like

      • Carolyn: What are you talking about? Jaclyn is suggesting that George Clooney would be president thereby making Amal 1st lady.

        Like

      • HaHa Caroline S., we can dream, right?🙂 In 2020, Trump will have to end his presidency or choose to run for 4 more years (2020-2024). Perhaps, a “joke”, but the humble point is….in this great country, USA, if you work hard, dream big, have passion and care for what is right and just….you can run for POTUS. Man, or woman, can run for president. As Hillary Clinton says, “Make the Impossible, Possible.” (Amal Clooney for First Lady 2020 would not be IMpossible…but of course George would have to run for President.🙂 HaHa ) All meant to be taken lightly, but you have to admit, she would be a dynamo in such a role. Just sayin’.🙂🙂

        Like

  6. Amal looks stunning here. I like her message, too. Since she got involved with George, I was really put off by the way that she/they seemed to use the paparazzi to further her career and personal ambitions. Glad that she’s toned it WAY down in that regard, lately. It makes me appreciate her message a lot more. It makes her seem more authentic and professional, when the media presents her in this way.

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  7. She looks very sophisticated and professional in this ensemble. I have to say it….she has the worse taste in shoes. Love that she is on the speaking circuit.

    Like

  8. @Amelie: I like reading this blog also because of the intelligent commenters here – you are certainly one of them!
    On Jackson: His/her comments are mostly aggressive (without any reason!), he/she improved a bit lately, especially after Jaclyn´s objection some months ago.
    I don´t care about trolls, these people are not worth my/our time, I simply ignore them. Trolls are destructive sociopaths, they want to destroy and to eliminate good commenters.
    Amelie, if you go, you do the trolls a favor and we would lose another intelligent commenter – sad!
    Greetings from France!

    Like

    • Hi Sophie, i agree so very much to your points of you. I Also think, that Jackson is a man. You can feel agressivity in every sentnce. But i also noticed the many likes for Jackson from Nati.

      Like

  9. Another quote from her speech:
    “The worst thing that we can do as women is not stand up for each other, and this is something we can practice every day, no matter where we are and what we do — women sticking up for other women, choosing to protect and celebrate each other instead of competing or criticizing one another.”

    Like

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