Waseem Jewellers Campaign with a model very similar to Amal Clooney / Alamuddin

photo 1Waseem Jewellers is a Pakistan jewelery. This new campaign reminds me Amal and you ?

More info here : https://www.facebook.com/waseemjewellerspk

photo 3 (1)

IMG_2433996692472For some comments, I made an exercise. It is not easy to find a picture of Amal without sunglasses and a nice make-up. Probably the model is wearing colored eye lens, but they could be sisters with the same hairstyle and make-up.

amal waseem

30 thoughts on “Waseem Jewellers Campaign with a model very similar to Amal Clooney / Alamuddin

  1. I find this rather offensive in its orientalism – ‘exotic’ beauty; ‘middle eastern woman’??? The model here is either Indian or Pakistani and looks typical of South Asian actresses and models. Amal looks distinctly middle eastern. The colour of their skin aside, I don’t see any similarities between Amal and this model. I can’t understand why this post exists – why as a society are we so caught up on issues of race and ethnicity, and on distinguishing and objectifying women by it? Take it down, it’s ridiculous, and so are some of the (I’m sure well-meaning) comments. – posted by an ‘oriental/exotic’ woman!

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    • While I don’t agree that Amal and the model look too much alike (hair color, only), I disagree that the woman in the advertisement looks “Indian or Pakistani.” The model looks very similar to many Arab women I know (and in my family).

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    • I read all the comments (the “politically correct comments”) here and i appreciated very much the level of knowledge of the commentators and all your opinions were well written and elaborated, great writing folks! You are a smart bunch!

      HOWEVER, lets just take it easy a bit.. Nati sure had no hidden agenda, and the images of the model or the word ” exotic” is really not offending any woman, not exposing her body to violence, but just enhancing her beauty. Being called an “exotic beauty” all he time myself, i feel flattered…not offended. I do see a bit the resemblance of the model with Amal..or maybe not… if i dig deeper…but i dont care to do that….it is just an innocent post and the Jewelry in this case are what is to look at (at least for me) and not to take in too deep into dividing our races. Come on people, lets stop this segregation, all people are exotic to each other! Lets embrace all beauties, all ethnicity! I am sure none of you commentators wanted to bring out any segregation or racism, but, this kind of deep diving upon such simple post, brings out discussions that – even though valid – about certain violence issues, it is not well placed under this post. Lets just smell the flowers a little and relax a little and enjoy those darn AMAZING jewelry and these beautiful ladies 🙂

      Liked by 1 person

  2. It’s offensive, when commenting on the ‘beauty of these women’, to use terms such as ‘exotic’ – it establishes a western-centric paradigm that objectifies women according to their ethnic origin.

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    • Quoting: “It’s offensive, when commenting on the ‘beauty of these women’, to use terms such as ‘exotic’ – it establishes a western-centric paradigm that objectifies women according to their ethnic origin.”

      With all due respect, baloney. Guess what — blonde, alabaster-skinned Scandinavians are considered exotic in Mediterranean countries. You’re projecting onto the word “exotic” your own p.c. sensibilities. And as an admirer of the real Edward Said, I don’t believe he would go along with your interpretation.

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      • ESR made a valid point. There’s a whole history (which is still ongoing) of violence and colonialism experienced by Middle Eastern women at the hands of European/American colonists that white females have simply never experienced. Part of this extremely violent history inflicted on Middle Eastern populations involves the objectification and identification of the “other” in certain ways by the colonists/propaganda of colonial powers: for example, the women are often portrayed as exotic temptresses, while the men are portrayed as effeminate and weak.

        Also, when I first read this post, it immediately smacked of “all Arabs look the same to me.” I realize that that wasn’t intended by the authors of the post, but that’s how it felt. Perhaps the authors of the post could be a little more sensitive to this issue in the future and take these comments as constructive criticism.

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      • There doesn’t seem to be a “Reply” button for Lady’s comment of October 27th at 6pm.

        Of course we know that “there’s a whole history (which is still ongoing) of violence and colonialism experienced by Middle Eastern women at the hands of European/American colonists.” Nobody’s disputing that. That also has nothing to do with this post.

        My politics are far left. And I’m a proud loudmouthed feminist. But I’m also attuned to the inanities of political correctness, which exhort people to see EVERYTHING through the lens of supposed subtext — supposed derogatory subtext.

        This post is about an ad featuring a beautiful woman that reminded the author of the beautiful Amal Alamuddin. That’s it.

        I’m surprised people aren’t going off about the use of feminine sexuality in advertising in general, an objectification that is as old as the hills (and which still wouldn’t be germane to the discussion). Advertisers know that all things Amal are popular now, just as all things Kate Middleton are, so of course they’re going to pitch their products with that popularity in mind.

        Liked by 1 person

  3. Actually, the model bears a stronger resemblance to Ramona Amiri. Not really seeing the likeness to Amal. Both the model and Amal are beautiful in their own ways. Same with Ramona.

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  4. To the Lady who said the model doesn’t look Indian or Pakistani but rather looks Arab, I would say that Arab is rather generic term to encompass many types of arabs (levantine, black etc). A yemenite rarab is not the same as a lebanese arabM Similarly Indian/Pakistani cannot be claSsified as one type as we have many North Indians who look very mediterranean.

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  5. That said thismodel does not look like Amal. Neither does she have the north indian mediterranean looK. She is very clearly south asian in her features despite the abvious attempt of contouring. Then again this whole region of India/@akistan having been invaded by GreeksN Turks and arabs they are a pretty mixed lot…..

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  6. These women are uniquely and independently beautiful. Gorgeous advertisement, excellent marketing. The model has her own features that make her beautiful and Amal, too, has her distinguished features that make her lovely, as well. In my humble opinion, both are quite beautiful. Thank You Nati for posting this and bringing the awareness to all readers who are enjoying your blog and daily posts and ID’s. You’re awesome. 🙂

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  7. It’s not a question of being ‘too’ politically correct (whatever that means)- of course this entire post also smacks of the objectification of women through advertising, but choose your battles – this blog wouldn’t be the best place to start that critique would it?

    I’m simply stating that this post is redolent with the sentiment that anyone vaguely ‘middle eastern/south asian’ looking now resembles Amal (the woman in the photo looks nothing like Amal to me), and the accompanying comments do categorise and objectify women (however well-intentioned) by the otherness of their ethnic origin. I find it hugely distasteful, and I’m entitled to express that.

    As for being politically correct – I’m not concerned about whether this will upset a disadvantaged minority, I’m sure many middle eastern or south asian commenters (myself aside) couldn’t care less. That’s not the point. The point is to draw attention to the many ways we as a society continue to sustain orientalism, whether we mean it or not, in our everyday transactions. This is just the kind of casual orientalism which Edward Said found so dangerous in western discourse.

    As for the commenter who said scandanavians are ‘exotic’ to those in the middle east – well yes, I suppose they would be, it’s all relative. But the question is relative to whom? The real issue is not the impression of exoticism itself, but the history of oppression and subjection which such attitudes sustained in the past and – I would argue – continue to do so today. Yes this is a casual and seemingly trivial example of it, but it nonetheless deserves pointing out without being ‘accused’ of being PC (and I’m not sure why that’s a bad thing to be honest).

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    • It is your personal perception. For me, I see two beautiful women. About the similarities, it is subjective. My post was not political oriented. It is not a problem, when people said that Amal is the new Jacqueline Kennedy, but it is a problem when I compare her to a pakistan model. When, I read you I understand better why there are so many problems in this world and why people are not able to live together peaceful.

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  8. Hi Lisa,
    I’m a fan of your radio programs (and a fan of classical music), if you are indeed posting as yourself.

    The reason why I pointed out the violence perpetuated on Middle Eastern peoples by various colonial powers (and conversely, the same form of violence was not inflicted on Europeans by any kind of Middle Eastern colonialism) is that I wanted to show you why there is a distinct difference between someone describing a Middle Eastern woman as “exotic,” versus someone calling a Scandinavian woman “exotic” (and btw, I’m half Scandinavian and half Arab, so this is an interesting discussion for me for more than one reason). In different contexts, the same word can have different meanings. What is important is not the word, itself, but the history (and accompanying meaning) that it carries with it. “Exotic” can be a loaded word for some people.

    Let’s try not to trivialize ESR’s comments – they all make excellent points.

    And, yes, I think that this would be the appropriate place to call out the objectification of women, in general, if and when it happens. Why not? I, personally, am sick and tired of the fashion industry using women’s bodies as marketing tools. In fact, it has been a little disturbing for me to watch the transformation of Amal from someone who seemed more genuinely herself into, essentially, a walking Clooney-trophy fashion industry advertisement.

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  9. I read all the comments (the “politically correct comments”) here and i appreciated very much the level of knowledge of the commentators and all your opinions were well written and elaborated, great writing folks! You are a smart bunch!

    HOWEVER, lets just take it easy a bit.. Nati sure had no hidden agenda, and the images of the model or the word ” exotic” is really not offending any woman, not exposing her body to violence, but just enhancing her beauty. Being called an “exotic beauty” all he time myself, i feel flattered…not offended. I do see a bit the resemblance of the model with Amal..or maybe not… if i dig deeper…but i dont care to do that….it is just an innocent post and the Jewelry in this case are what is to look at (at least for me) and not to take in too deep into dividing our races. Come on people, lets stop this segregation, all people are exotic to each other! Lets embrace all beauties, all ethnicity! I am sure none of you commentators wanted to bring out any segregation or racism, but, this kind of deep diving upon such simple post, brings out discussions that – even though valid – about certain violence issues, it is not well placed under this post. Lets just smell the flowers a little and relax a little and enjoy those darn AMAZING jewelry and these beautiful ladies 🙂

    Like

  10. You really need to travel more. That model looks Indian/Pakistani and Amal looks Middle Eastern.

    While both of them are beautiful they do NOT “look alike”. The assumption that they “look alike” tells us that you haven’t been exposed to different cultures or ethnicities (enough). You should correct this. Try travel and immersion. Vacations do NOT count!

    Before you start going off on me, I am a mixture of 2 very distinct ethnicities and I have lived in 4 very different parts of the world. Half of my family is Indian so no, Amal doesn’t look “Indian”. To me this is absurd. And yes, one of the places I have lived is the Middle East.

    And while you’re at it, you also should read some Geography and some History too about India/Pakistan/Bangladesh and The Middle East. That will also give you some context on the importance of jewelry to India etc and will inform you on the styles you see on the advertisements.

    As for the people getting offended by “exotic”. Look up the word in the dictionary instead of just projecting your individual feelings on it. An Indian or Middle Eastern or an African or an European or a Hispanic (or a Martian for that matter) will be exotic to anyone who has grown up in a homogenous society and let’s just be honest here. Most places in the world are homogenous!

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    • I travel a lot and I am open-minded person. I meet and help people from all the world. It was only a personal point of view independent from the “ethnicity” of both women. We are all humans first.

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